Hello and welcome to my blog! 

 
If you've found me online, it is likely because you are wondering just who the person is behind all of those confusing letters at the end of my hard-to-pronounce last name. In counseling, it's guaranteed that I will ask a lot of questions about YOU, but here is a little information about me, the counselor. 
 
First of all, I'm a real person. It's easy to fall into the trap of thinking that therapists are somehow supernatural creatures who live completely peaceful and magical existences. Although I would love for this to be true, it simply is not. Even though I pride myself on my professionalism, when you meet with me for counseling, expect to sit with an authentic person, with real life experiences, just like you.  While our therapeutic relationship will be all about you and your needs, you will hear me use self-disclosure on occasion in therapy. Here is a little bit about me and how my story shapes who I am as your counselor: 
 
In addition to my professional identity, I am also a wife and mom to three wonderful (albeit maddeningly energetic) boys. We live in Hurst, just a short drive from my North Richland Hills office. We do sports, we do rough-housing, and we do LOUD very well. In addition to being a rowdy bunch, we have also spent the last seven years blending this amazing family. Divorce recovery and blended family issues are something that I specialize in and have experienced personally. This helps me bring a unique perspective to counseling related to these topics. When we start talking about these issues in counseling, know that I've been there, done that, still have the t-shirt and am here to hold space for you to discuss how these things personally impact your life. 
 
Not only am I a proud partner, I am more specifically, the proud wife of a first responder. Although I'm not always proud of how some in these professions conduct themselves, I have a first-hand view of how choosing to work in these professions can impact mental health and affect families. Together we have navigated the frequent schedule changes, overnight shifts, and worried, sleepless nights. I have a passion for helping first responders unpack the traumas that they have been carrying, and am honored when I am able to walk with these men and women on their journey to achieving better mental health. 
 
Along with being a wife and mother, I've spent the majority of my professional life working with children of all ages, in just about every setting that you can imagine. From being an educator to doing trauma work with kids from hard places, I've been with kids when we could celebrate finally acing that really hard test, but have also sat with children while they've told some of their most difficult stories. I love working with children in counseling, and bring many years of experience that allows me to be on their level and speak their language. 
 
When I get to take off my counselor hat, my friends and family might describe me as a mushy, sarcastic, empath who is sometimes loud, always goofy, and passionate about many things, including health and wellness, spirituality, conservation, travel, and the ability to just have fun. My kids might describe me as the crazy plant and animal lady who thinks plastic is poison and is always talking about feelings, but I prefer to think of myself as just another person, trying to figure out this crazy life one day at a time. So if you're still reading this, and haven't rolled your eyes yet, we might just make a pretty good team! 
 
 

 

 

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disclaimer

I'm so glad that you found my website! You should know that although this blog is authored by a licensed mental health provider, it does not constitute therapeutic advice or a therapeutic relationship, nor does it replace a real relationship with a mental health expert or medical provider. I hope that you will find the content helpful and interesting, but the content is intended for educational purposes only. Interactions with this website, including blog comments, email, and web forms are not confidential forms on communication and utilizing these types of communication may jeapordize your anonymity. Should you require emergency assistance, please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255, dial 911, or go to your nearest emergency room.